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The BoE and ECB render the US bond market the only game in town

Now that the Bank of England has commenced purchases of gilts and committed to a programme of corporate bond buybacks, alongside similar measures being presently undertaken by the ECB, it is worth taking a step back and thinking about valuations in sterling fixed income.

Let’s take a brief look at what has happened so far in 2016 in government bonds. The ultra-long conventional gilt has returne…

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Will the Bank of England’s latest banking sector policies promote lending to the real economy?

Guest contributor – Mark Robinson (Financial Institutions Analyst, M&G Fixed Income Team)

The Bank of England recently announced two new measures focussed on the banking sector, which are primarily designed to improve monetary policy transmission from banks to households and corporates and, indirectly, are probably intended to stimulate loan growth. In this blog post, I’ll examine these actions…

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Case study: Could Trump’s brand affect bond prices?

Earlier this year I gave a top-down macro assessment of Trump’s potential impact on Latin American remittances, should he become President. As the race continues, I now take a bottom-up micro view and assess Trump’s potential impact on an individual bond issue associated with the Trump Organization.

In 2007 the Panamanian real estate market was growing robustly, with prices experiencing double-…

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Why do people buy negative yielding bonds?

Guest contributor – Craig Moran (Fund Manager, M&G Multi-Asset Team)

The following blog was first posted on M&G’s Multi-Asset Team Blog, www.episodeblog.com. M&G’s Equities Team also regularly post their views at www.equitiesforum.com.

These are extraordinary times in financial markets. On a daily basis we are being bombarded with news headlines of political turmoil, market gyrations, forecasts…

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Volatility for U.S. hospital bonds ahead

As the rhetoric of the U.S. presidential race heats up over the summer campaigning months, one topic we are likely to hear much on is health care.  Health care in the U.S. is always a highly charged political subject, and now even more so with extra scrutiny on prescription drug prices and continued debates over the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or Obamacare.  Obamacare is deeply unpopular with the…

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Pre-exit, Brexit, what was it? Why the BoE should delay a change in monetary policy.

Post the Brexit referendum we are in an economic purgatory. The brexiteers are looking forward to a democratic led revitalisation of the economy, while the bremainers fear that the “little England” mentality will leave us isolated and depressed. Most people have an opinion, and the economic opinion that matters the most is that of the Bank of England (BoE). The market has absorbed the news of B…

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Is QE unquestionably supportive for risk assets? I think not.

We have written about quantitative easing (QE) many times over the years, yet there remains more to be said: the great QE experiment is not yet over. Given the result of the EU referendum, speculation is rife as to whether the Bank of England will embark on another round of QE to stimulate the UK economy; arguably making this a good time to debate the efficacy of such strategies.

It’s safe to s…

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Should the Bank of England start buying sterling corporate bonds again?

When the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee meets next week, the market expects that they will cut rates, especially now that even outgoing hawk, Martin Weale (who has been at the Bank for 71 meetings so far, and voted to hike 12 times, and to hold 59 times) says that he will support a reduction.  A resumption of the Funding for Lending (FLS) scheme is also a possibility (many economis…

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boe-unveil-bumper

The Bank of England could be about to unveil a bumper monetary policy package

Despite keeping interest rates on hold at the 4th July meeting, the minutes of the Monetary Policy Committee indicated that “most members expect an easing in August” (even long-time hawk Martin Weale has shifted to a dovish stance). Subsequently, markets are pricing in a staggering 98.3% probability of a rate cut at the next meeting in 8 days’ time. With UK data expected to deteriorate over the…

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Four years of the ECB doing “whatever it takes”

Transport yourself back to July 26, 2012. Borrowing costs for the “peripheral” European nations are uncomfortably high. Ireland, Portugal and Greece were in the process of applying for bailouts, while the Spanish banking system was dangerously close to falling over. It wasn’t a question of when an EU member would leave the single currency bloc, but who? Step forward ECB President Mario Draghi, …

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