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macro and politics

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IMF and World Bank meetings 2016: China, Japan, UK and Europe

Last year we blogged with our key takeaways from the IMF and World Bank meetings and this year is no different. Claudia Calich and I tag-teamed between the Washington based events, participating in the many wide ranging discussions that took place, so we’re doing the same here. Claudia will be providing the emerging market coverage, while I share some insights from developed markets, alongside …

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Armageddon fatigue: reasons to be optimistic in the longer term

Watching the news flow on the global economy is dispiriting. Ask an economist what springs to mind when they hear the word “Europe”. They will probably reply with thoughts about negative interest rates, deflation and debt concerns. It isn’t much better when you bring up the economic outlook for the US (“the upcoming election is a concern”), Japan (“the BoJ is at the limits of monetary policy”),…

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The book taking France by storm. Économie du Bien Commun – a review.

During my free time in August I read the book that has taken the French political and economic landscape by storm (no, it’s not  “Capital” by Thomas Piketty). Nobel Prize winning economist, Jean Tirole, has written a book entitled “Économie du Bien Commun” (or “economy for the common good”). The book is written in plain language and attempts to reach a large audience, including readers with ve…

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Either the demographic bond models are broken, or yields are headed to 10%.

For fixed income fund managers it was once the case that if you understood the evolution of the relative sizes of the various cohorts of the young, the working, and the retired in a population, you could predict bond returns.  Lots of workers relative to the “unproductive” young or elderly meant low wage pressures, lots of demand for savings assets such as bonds, and lower government borrowing….

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Didn’t make it to the FT Festival of Finance? We interviewed Pettis, Keen, White and Leaviss for their views.

A few of the M&G bond team recently attended the FT’s Festival of Finance. Known as the Glastonbury of the Financial World, M&G’s Anthony Doyle brought a camera crew along and interviewed a number of speakers on the day, including Michael Pettis (China expert), Steve Keen (of “Debunking Economics” fame), Alex White (political pundit from The Economist) and our own Jim Leaviss. Watch the upcomin…

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Regional unemployment rates across the UK

A vision of the future? Optimal currency areas within the United Kingdom

The year is 2020 and King Henry IX, the recently installed head of state of the United Kingdom of Northern England, Wales and Northern Ireland stands in a room overlooking the Trent River. Most of his subjects still refer to him simply as “Harry”. His popularity with the electorate is seen as a key factor behind the surprise victory for the monarchists in the recent constitutional referendum fo…

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Dr Pippa Malmgren’s “Signals”. Watch our interview with her, and win her latest book.

Here’s the latest in our series of interviews with the authors of interesting and important new books on economics, politics and investing.  In it, Pippa Malmgren – a global strategist and former economics advisor to President George W. Bush – talks about “Signals”, her book about the challenges facing the global economy today both on a state level (China, Russia, the US) and for households.  I…

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Does the Overton Window apply to monetary policy? And four other things.

A few things that I’ve found interesting over the past week or so:

  1. I’m just back from a week’s holiday in France, and my news source whilst I was away was the hotel’s International New York Times. Terrible for English Championship football rumours, but lots about US politics and in particular the recent discussion about the Overton Window.  Joseph Overton’s theory is that there is a limited ra…

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The Central American Remittance Crunch – who would lose most from a Trump Presidency?

The US election campaign has surprised everyone thus far. Candidate Donald Trump has vowed to deport all of the 11 million illegal immigrants currently living in the US. He has also declared that he would impound all remittance payments derived from illegal wages. We have written before how Central America and the Caribbean would benefit from improving US growth and have been invested in variou…

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15.11.04 blog CC1

Colombia: At risk of a rating downgrade to BBB-

Part of the ABC of Latin American debt series (see here for views on Argentina and here for Brazil)

During my recent trip to Latin America it was funny (but not surprising) to hear the locals worrying about Colombia becoming the next Brazil. In turn, Brazilians are worried about becoming Argentina (though I believe the Argentinean problems are much more solvable in the near term than Brazil’s) …

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