Author profile

Anjulie Rusius

Years in the bond markets: 8

Specialist subjects: Macro economics

Likes: Peanut butter and chocolate waffles, book clubs, new socks and dinner parties

Heroes: Anne Bronte, Lady Margaret Beaufort, Mr Darcy

Three things to watch as the Czech National Bank removes its FX floor later this year

For over 3 years, the Czech National Bank (CNB) has maintained the Czech Koruna (CZK) exchange rate close to 27 CZK to the Euro (EUR), essentially using its currency – as opposed to interest rates – as the policy tool to achieve its inflation target. Earlier this month however, the CNB advised that this strategy would be exited “around the middle of 2017”. Though the timing remains ambiguous (t…

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Does the US government bond market sell off mark the return of the bond vigilantes?

The bond market was intimidating during the Clinton years, and has started as it means to go on for Trump’s term.  As we celebrate this website’s 10th anniversary, it proves fitting that the bond market reminds us why we named the blog as we did.

The result of the US election was a surprise given the polls, but the exceptionally short-lived “risk-off” reaction in bond markets has been just as …

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IMF and World Bank meetings 2016: China, Japan, UK and Europe

Last year we blogged with our key takeaways from the IMF and World Bank meetings and this year is no different. Claudia Calich and I tag-teamed between the Washington based events, participating in the many wide ranging discussions that took place, so we’re doing the same here. Claudia will be providing the emerging market coverage, while I share some insights from developed markets, alongside …

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The Bank of England could be about to unveil a bumper monetary policy package

Despite keeping interest rates on hold at the 4th July meeting, the minutes of the Monetary Policy Committee indicated that “most members expect an easing in August” (even long-time hawk Martin Weale has shifted to a dovish stance). Subsequently, markets are pricing in a staggering 98.3% probability of a rate cut at the next meeting in 8 days’ time. With UK data expected to deteriorate over the…

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M&G Panoramic Outlook: The growing opportunity in corporate bond markets, by Richard Woolnough

Last year proved a tough year for investment grade corporate bonds, with credit spreads moving wider. Fast forward six months to today and the decision of the UK referendum to leave the EU is continuing to shake markets, with European credit spreads now even further elevated. It is nevertheless important to recognise that these bouts of volatility can however present buying opportunities as cor…

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Knowing your nordics

Knowing your Nordics: An overview of central bank policy and the negative rate environment

There has been a barrage of G7 central bank coverage in March, culminating in much talk, but resulting in – on the whole – little new action. The Bank of Japan remained on hold (after adopting a surprise negative rate policy at the end of January), the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) delivered a “dovish hold” (keeping interest rates unchanged while lowering their longer term rate guidance)…

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The El Niño effect

Need motivation for your New Year diet? M&G’s cake index shows that cake is getting more expensive

I blogged in 2014 with good news for cake lovers; falling soft commodity prices indicated that the cost of baking cakes was getting cheaper.  Unfortunately (and in contrast to hard commodity prices, notably oil recently hitting new post global financial crisis lows), the final quarter of 2015 depicted a reversal in trend with soft commodity prices on the rise.

In September we discussed the pote…

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Three reasons why the UK will not raise rates anytime soon

With the Fed recently raising its interest rates via a unanimous vote, I’ve been wondering whether the UK will shortly follow suit. The market seems to think not, pricing in the first UK rate rise in Q1 of 2017, compared to two further US rate hikes in 2016. At face value this huge divergence feels strange; both countries are targeting (and undershooting) a 2% inflation rate, both have similar …

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Is there still slack in the US labour market?

We have often blogged about the current tightness in the US labour market; in particular the initial jobless claims number as a percentage of the working age population being at all-time lows.  The Fed too has recently produced indicators to tell a similar tale; looking at unconventional unemployment proxies – such as the insured unemployment rate in this recent post – suggests that labour mark…

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The improvement in the US jobs market is quantitatively huge – but qualitatively mediocre

The condition of the US labour market is one of the hot topics in the ongoing “will they / won’t they” Fed rate hiking debate, and as Bloomberg’s Economic Surprises screen shows, this sector is the only area of the economy outperforming expectations of late.

Labour market indicators continue to impress, with employment indicators strong on many measures. Initial Jobless Claims have dropped to …

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