Monthly Archives:

January 2017

A dozen things I’m finding interesting in bond markets. Includes weasels.

1. On the face of it, long term US Treasury yields are looking fair value, having traded on the dear side since the middle of 2014.  Below is a chart you will have seen before on the blog as I’ve been using it for some time.  It shows the relationship between the Fed’s long term expectations of short term interest rates (taken, with a pinch of salt, from the FOMC’s dot plots) and the bond marke…

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Research trip: Mexico & Trump – a key call in emerging markets

President Trump’s anti-Mexico rhetoric has made Mexican assets one of the key calls in emerging market debt. I have just returned from a research trip to Mexico where I met with local economists, analysts, and corporate bond issuers. Below are a number of observations from my time there.

Donald Trump won the election on a fairly protectionist rhetoric – with a special focus on Mexico – and the …

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Private sector credit in China is approaching an historic crisis level

Credit is the oil that lubricates the engine of an economy. For this reason, economists watch credit statistics closely, in order to assess the sustainability of growth. If credit isn’t growing, it suggests households and firms aren’t confident enough in their respective outlooks to borrow and invest. If credit grows too quickly, it could result in financial and macroeconomic instability – hist…

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President Trump will be good for the transmission mechanism of animal spirits

The world will soon turn to the inauguration of Donald Trump. For at least the next four years, global investment markets will be focusing on his Presidency. This is always the case when a new President takes over the reins of the most economically powerful country in the world, but why does it feel more important this time?

Firstly, political deadlock has been broken. For the first time since …

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This week on Bond Vigilantes TV

Join us on Bond Vigilantes TV, where this week we discuss:

  1. Sterling – how low might it go?
  2. The curious case of rising US dollar and US Treasury yield correlations;
  3. Corporate bond markets and economic uncertainty;
  4. Euro corporate bond issuance – a sign of things to come?

Tune in for our thoughts on the stories making headlines this week.

 

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China Renminbi: the USD $50,000 question

Last week, in line with expectations, China announced the renewal of the $50,000 limit of dollar purchases by individuals. What’s changed however is that the foreign exchange commission (SAFE) has tightened the scrutiny on the foreign exchange purchases. Applicants are now required to detail the purpose behind their transactions in order to ensure that the purchase is for “suitable purposes” (e…

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A wrap up of 2016 bond and currency market performance

Turning back the clock to the first week of 2016, fears of a Chinese slowdown and the Federal Reserve beginning to normalise rates hit stock markets hard. By Valentine’s Day bond yields had fallen to – what was then – all-time lows.  But we hadn’t seen anything yet. Ongoing ECB QE, Brexit, UK QE, novel Japanese monetary policy, president-elect Trump and ECB tapering. In a year of political and …

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This week on Bond Vigilantes TV

Join us on Bond Vigilantes TV, where this week we discuss:
1) 2016 – a quick review
2) recent government bond yield sell-off – was it really that big?
3) Eurozone inflation – back, but for how long?

Tune in for the charts, articles and the Bond Vigilantes team’s thoughts on the stories making the headlines in the bond markets this week.

 

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