Category Archives:

banks

Would demutualising Germany’s Sparkassen (savings banks) kick-start consumption growth and give the eurozone a boost?

This week the 10-year German bund yield hit a new record low of -0.33% in the wake of Draghi’s Sintra speech which had echoes of his 2012 “whatever it takes” declaration. Why so dovish? Manufacturing data from the eurozone has been universally bad lately, and inflation expectations are collapsing. The core inflation rate is now just 0.8% and the ECB’s 2% target looks an impossible goal. The mar…

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The Royal Commission into Misconduct: A Deceptive Smokescreen for Australian Bank Bond Investors?

Last week’s conclusion of the Royal Commission into misconduct in Australia’s financial services sector has rightfully made international headlines. After digesting the 1011-page report, investors breathed a sigh of relief and pushed Australian bank shares sharply higher. The Commission’s findings and recommendations have been well-documented in the popular press (here), and the debates around …

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Author interview – Adam Tooze: Rewriting the Global Financial Crisis

Ten years after the outbreak of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) it is time to pause and reflect about an event whose consequences still have a major impact on financial markets and people’s daily lives. In his book “Crashed: How a decade of financial crisis changed the world,” UK economist and Columbia University professor Adam Tooze challenges the way the GFC has been storified, points at so…

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BVTV: What could go right for European banks?

Veronique Chapplow and Ed Booth

Ten years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, US banks have gone from strength to strength whilst European banks have been losing ground and are trapped with low returns. Ed Booth, banking analyst at M&G’s equities team, talks to Investment Specialist Veronique Chapplow to discuss why US banks have become attractive earnings compounders and why their European …

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Turkish banks: this time it’s different?

Guest contributor – Elsa Dargent (M&G Financials Credit Research team)

Turkish banks have been subject to closer scrutiny over the past weeks as political events have triggered a confidence crisis with a run on the Lira (down by 38% year-to-date vs the dollar and by 26% since end-June, the banks’ last reporting date), a sizeable widening in Turkish govt yields, and an even sharper widening in b…

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A new SONIA based bond. Does this mark the beginning of the end of LIBOR in public debt markets?

Last week the European Investment Bank (EIB) issued the first public bond based on the reformed SONIA benchmark, marking another step forward in the process of benchmark reform in the U.K. The 5-year, £1bn issue was priced with a coupon of 35bp above overnight SONIA.  The deal may very well serve as a benchmark for future issuance in the LIBOR-less world which the Bank of England and other regu…

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Beware the death of Libor

Guest contributor – David Covey (Financial Institutions Analyst, M&G Fixed Income Team)

The end is coming for the London interbank offered rate (Libor).  Ten years after suspicions emerged that this key interest rate was being manipulated in the financial crisis, regulators are ramping up their efforts to replace the benchmark rates. The Bank of England (BoE) and US Federal Reserve are leading …

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The 2nd largest bailout in British history and its economic effects

The Slavery Abolition Act of 1833 formally freed 800,000 Africans who were then the legal property of Britain’s slave owners. What is less well known is that the same act contained a provision for the financial compensation of the owners of those slaves, by the British taxpayer, for the loss of their “property”. The compensation commission was the government body established to evaluate the cla…

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Eight quick bullet points on the Banco Popular resolution

1. The ECB can act quickly when considering if a bank has reached the point of non-viability (PONV), and enacting a resolution plan.  The speed with which regulators acted clearly took the market by surprise.  At the same time, how the regulator determines a bank to be non-viable is still a grey area (considering the situation around some of the weaker Italian banks).

2. EU stress tests are not…

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Swiss bank account holders: negative interest rates are here to stay

It was big news when Postfinance, the first Swiss bank categorised as “too-big-to-fail”, announced the introduction of negative interest rates to customers holding deposits of CHF 1 million and above. Many are now asking how long it will take until banks apply this approach to retail savers. I would argue that it may not be too long given the situation for Swiss banks remains challenging.

Part …

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