Category Archives:

monetary policy

Financial conditions suggest the case for more hawkish Fed than inflation dynamics would suggest

Guest contributor – Jean-Paul Jaegers, CFA, CQF (Senior Investment Strategist, Prudential Portfolio Management Group)

A lot has been written on the recent softness in US inflation data, as headline inflation pulled back, with a similar trend in core inflation. Admittedly, a number of unusual factors have partly been a driver behind this, although more importantly there is quite some persistence…

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Is it time for the Bank of England to sell corporate bonds back to the market?

On August 4th last year, the Bank of England announced a series of easing measures in response to the Brexit referendum results. They were very concerned regarding a potential slowdown and collapse in both the economy and corporate confidence and so implemented a variety of measures; reducing interest rates, increasing liquidity lines for banks, and reintroducing their gilt and corporate bond p…

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Five years on from “whatever it takes”

Today marks five years on from Mario Draghi’s now famous ‘whatever it takes’ remarks, widely credited with sparking a reversal in the Eurozone’s fortunes.

Below are five charts offering some insights into the European Central Bank’s successes and failures in the ensuing period, as well as some of the challenges that remain.

  1. Funding costs in the periphery

Five years ago, funding costs for the …

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The Israeli Shekel: Flying under the radar

Though the recent US Treasury report did not name any country as a currency manipulator (see more details on this in Mario’s blog), the monitoring list centres on larger economies that meet the following criteria:

  1. The country has a significant bilateral trade surplus with the United States defined as more than USD 20 billion.
  2. The country has a current account surplus of at least 3% of GDP and …

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Canada’s increasingly divergent rate path

Yields on Canadian sovereign bonds have been dragged higher in recent months, with the yield on the 10-year bond recently reaching 2 year highs. This sell-off appears to reflect the US reflation narrative, rather than the economic fundamentals of the Canadian economy.

The market currently thinks the Bank of Canada will remain on hold throughout 2017, pricing in only one rate hike – a 20 basis …

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Mortgages and monetary policy in the US and UK

The cost of new mortgage borrowing and payments on outstanding household debt can have a large impact on the rate of growth of an economy. For this reason, central bankers are interested in the transmission mechanism of monetary policy. It has been shown that interest rates can have a stronger influence on an economy where there are a high proportion of variable rather than fixed-rate mortgages…

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Poor old ECB. Damned if it does, damned if it doesn’t.

The votes are in and it’s pretty unanimous. Despite Mario Draghi’s best efforts to persuade otherwise, the market is clear that today’s announcements are tantamount to tapering. Frankly anything less than an extension of Euro 80bn per month, irrespective of the duration, was likely to have been taken as such, with scant evidence of the inflation target being achieved during the forecast horizon…

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Does the US government bond market sell off mark the return of the bond vigilantes?

The bond market was intimidating during the Clinton years, and has started as it means to go on for Trump’s term.  As we celebrate this website’s 10th anniversary, it proves fitting that the bond market reminds us why we named the blog as we did.

The result of the US election was a surprise given the polls, but the exceptionally short-lived “risk-off” reaction in bond markets has been just as …

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Unconventional interest rate tightening underway in the US economy

Last week, the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) decided that despite low unemployment and a sustained increase in breakeven inflation expectations since September, it was appropriate to maintain the Fed Funds rate between 0.25-0.50%. In trying to understand this action, and why the Fed is happy to wait until December to hike rates, a number of theories have been suggested by the financial c…

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Will the Bank of England’s latest banking sector policies promote lending to the real economy?

Guest contributor – Mark Robinson (Financial Institutions Analyst, M&G Fixed Income Team)

The Bank of England recently announced two new measures focussed on the banking sector, which are primarily designed to improve monetary policy transmission from banks to households and corporates and, indirectly, are probably intended to stimulate loan growth. In this blog post, I’ll examine these actions…

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