Will the thawing in US-Cuban relations bring havoc to the region’s bonds?

It is August and I should be enjoying a beach holiday, rather than being stuck in London under temperamental weather. To mitigate my despair, I decided to write some blogs on the topic of tourism. Given the ongoing normalisation of US-Cuba relations, I have been looking at the impact that this unprecedented shift in policy could have on the region. Although the embargo and travel restrictions r…

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A message to Brazilian tourists: stop travelling abroad and help your country

S&P placed Brazil’s foreign currency ratings (BBB-) on negative outlook yesterday, only one small step away from junk. S&P’s negative outlook implies that there is a probability higher than 33% that Brazil’s rating will be subject to a downward revision in the next 18 months. According to the statement, S&P “could lower the ratings if there were further deterioration in Brazil’s external and fi…

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EU implicit interest rates

Greek debt forgiveness: Where there’s a will, there’s a way

The Euro Summit meeting in Brussels that took place a couple of weeks ago seems to have finally provided some temporary closure to the Greek debt crisis. The dreaded Grexit scenario was avoided (at least for the moment) and the Greek government was able to repay its arrears to the IMF and the ECB using the €7.2 billion bridge loan provided by the European Council. Looking ahead, this short term…

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The Euro, confidence and consumption will drive European GDP

It has been difficult to filter through the noise of the Greece situation these past few months. But when you stop and have a look at the economic backdrop, things don’t look as bad as some of the alarming headlines might have you believe. Some significant economic headwinds have turned into tailwinds, which will likely drive European growth for the next 18 months.

1. The Euro

In April, the Eu…

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Mike Riddell’s work here is done

Mike Riddell, who worked in and around the bond team here at M&G for the past twelve years, has decided to move on. We can’t say where to yet, but it’s to another big bond fund manager and it’s a good move for him. Normally we’d ask the airbrushing team to have him removed from the official histories, but he did a great job for us and we are all sad to see him go.

Mike did a great job running …

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M&G Panoramic Outlook: The Case for Global Corporate Bond Investing

The euro’s 12-year low against the dollar is a mixed blessing for US companies. On the one hand, the US manufacturing sector is suffering from an uncompetitive currency and lower export revenues. But on the other, rock bottom European interest rates have given US companies an attractive opportunity to issue bonds denominated in euros and lock in cheap financing. For example, in the first quarte…

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The case for global corporate bond investing – Wolfgang Bauer

US companies issued a record amount of more than €27 billion of euro-denominated bonds (known as ‘reverse Yankees’) in the first quarter of 2015, taking advantage of the relatively low financing costs on offer in Europe compared to their home market. This is just one example of how corporate issuers routinely capitalise on local corporate bond market supply and demand dynamics in search of chea…

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M&G Panoramic Outlook: Jim Leaviss’ views for the second half of 2015

Deflation. Liquidity. Greece. These are the words of 2015 if you are a bond investor. The year started off with a bang, or rather a break, when the Swiss National Bank (SNB) announced the surprise abandonment of the peg with the euro. This was only a mere week before the European Central Bank (ECB) embarked upon an historic quantitative easing programme. Deflation took hold in Europe, governmen…

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Jim Leaviss’ view ahead of the second half of 2015 in bond markets

It may only be June as I write this, but it already feels as if we have crammed a whole year’s worth of events into the first six months of 2015.

The year kicked off at a whirlwind pace, with the long-awaited announcement by the European Central Bank (ECB) that it would finally begin its quantitative easing (QE) programme nearly upstaged by the Swiss National Bank’s surprise move shortly befo…

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Argentina saw a huge rebound in growth when it abandoned its dollar peg

Greece is not Argentina: don’t expect exports to drive growth if Greece leaves the euro

I have heard it said, semi-seriously, that the biggest risk for the Eurozone isn’t that Greece leaves the single currency and its economy collapses, but that it leaves and thrives.  In this scenario Greece starts again, debt free, able to adapt fiscal easing rather than austerity, and with a devalued “new drachma” encouraging an influx of tourists and a manufacturing and agricultural export boo…

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