A video from our NY research trip examining the US healthcare sector

It has been a while since we last uploaded a video from one of our U.S. research trips. Richard and I recently travelled to New York to meet with various local analysts and strategists. The timing of the trip could not have been better: the Federal Reserve needs to decide whether and how to continue its rate hiking cycle and event risk in the economy is high. We had the opportunity to discuss a…

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Bond market reaction to UK “Leave” vote

The UK has voted to “Leave” the EU.  We’re seeing some significant moves in fixed income assets first thing this morning as financial markets had very much discounted a “Remain” outcome, in line with the last opinion polls and in particular the betting markets which had heavily backed that outcome.  The biggest market movements though have occurred in the FX markets where the pound fell from ne…

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The FT Festival of Finance, Friday July 1st at the HAC in London. Win a ticket!

This year is the 10th anniversary of the Bond Vigilantes blog.  When we started it back in 2006, rates in the UK had just risen to 4.75%, the US housing market had seen price rises of between 5% and 12% for more than 6 years in a row, and Twitter was a just few months old.   Nottingham Forest finished 4th in the Championship, and the Scissor Sisters were number one in the charts with “I Don’t f…

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Regional unemployment rates across the UK

A vision of the future? Optimal currency areas within the United Kingdom

The year is 2020 and King Henry IX, the recently installed head of state of the United Kingdom of Northern England, Wales and Northern Ireland stands in a room overlooking the Trent River. Most of his subjects still refer to him simply as “Harry”. His popularity with the electorate is seen as a key factor behind the surprise victory for the monarchists in the recent constitutional referendum fo…

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What I am doing to protect against Brexit… or Bremain.

Over the last few days and weeks, as the odds of a vote to leave in the referendum have moved from a remote possibility to somewhat less so, market participants have spent more and more time wondering about how they are positioned going into the vote, relative to their benchmark, their peer group, or their risk budget. The significant moves that we have seen in recent trading sessions show pret…

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A Germanic problem

I attended a conference last week where European Central Bank (ECB) bashing was approaching fever pitch. The crux of the argument goes a little something like this:

“The ECB have lost the plot. Monetary policy has become impotent. The ECB is at the lower bound and the law of diminishing returns results only in an ever greater misallocation of resources, punishing savers and rewarding speculatio…

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Dr Pippa Malmgren’s “Signals”. Watch our interview with her, and win her latest book.

Here’s the latest in our series of interviews with the authors of interesting and important new books on economics, politics and investing.  In it, Pippa Malmgren – a global strategist and former economics advisor to President George W. Bush – talks about “Signals”, her book about the challenges facing the global economy today both on a state level (China, Russia, the US) and for households.  I…

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the us economy is not slowing down its getting close to full employment

The US economy is not slowing down, it’s getting close to full employment

We are a little bemused following the latest US Employment report. The headline figure of +38,000 jobs for May (expected: +160,000) disappointed the market, with Treasuries rallying and a June/July rate hike off the table in most economists’ views. A decline in the participation rate to 62.6% helped the unemployment rate fall to 4.7%, the lowest level since 2007, while average hourly earnings r…

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The unintended consequences of Negative Rate World Part II. An update.

At the start of April I wrote about some of the unintended consequences of central banks setting negative interest rates. I also promised to update the blog as we spotted more interesting implications, and asked readers to submit examples too.  Thanks for those who got in touch.  Here are some more of the interesting things that happen when the zero lower bound ceases to exist, as well as links…

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Robert Gordon’s “The Rise and Fall of American Growth”. An interview, and win a copy of his book.

Professor Robert Gordon of North-Western University was in town this week to give speeches at Prospect Magazine (which is ace by the way) and the LSE.  His latest book, “The Rise and Fall of American Growth” was released earlier this year, and is a tremendously powerful antidote to the wave of techno-optimism we might feel when we see shiny electric cars and gadgets coming out of Silicon Valley…

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